We all know that retail pharmacy or health care in general can be a difficult and often thankless job. I received this letter in the mail and it made me happy!
grateful letter
The gratitude was well received by myself and staff. Eventually I began to think about metrics. Pharmacists and techs spend hours every day dealing with undecipherable prescriptions, impossible billing, and a wide assortment of barriers to good pharmacy care. As pharmacists we dole out free advice on a regular basis to patients that are usually appreciative. Patients will talk to us about anything.
On the same day that I received this letter, I had a man in his 40’s wondering why his doctor ordered Prozac for him when he was not depressed, just dissatisfied with the quality, quantity, and duration of his erections. He broached the subject and responded to one of my counseling questions by saying, “I think I’d be OK with a group of half naked cheerleaders.” That’s when the conversation moved to a more discreet level.
Later, a student pharmacist asked for my assistance counseling a young woman who wanted help selecting a prenatal vitamin. Turns out she was trying to get pregnant, and after explaining the benefits of a prenatal product and other healthy options, she took the conversation to a deeper level. After discussing underwear choices for her husband, she volunteered information about her tipped uterus and asked, “are there any positions that might compensate for that?” I was tempted to tell her the joke about positional gender selection, but my professionalism vetoed that idea. In case you are wondering, missionary and girl on top are the top two recommendations.

All three of these interactions are wonderful and meaningful experiences for the people involved. They do not, however, have an effect on our metrics, which, increasingly, is how our job performance is measured. We are constantly bombarded with data that is presented as helpful information to make the job easier as we gain effectiveness. Yet our “Percent Effective” measure looks only at the labor hours (and minutes) gained for the tasks that are required to fill prescriptions. The bottom line is that the biggest chunk of data demands that we fill a prescription using about 8 minutes of labor. And, there is time built into that to allow for counseling, regulatory compliance, inventory control etc., but at the end of the day it’s how many Rxs were filled with the labor permitted.

You can easily see that the scenario that Jay describes in the letter would have taken much more than 8 minutes to complete. Multiple people were involved and it required several faxes and two phone calls to the prescriber, calls to the patient, and multiple attempts to successfully bill the claim for the product. The forty-something with problems “down there” and I had a ten minute conversation exploring possible causes and solutions for his dilemma, which included the recommendation that he should keep his lust for cheerleaders as a fantasy. The young mother-to-be was another lengthy discussion that started out looking at vitamins and evolved into a frank discussion of the physiology of fertility.

All three of these examples had great outcomes and yet only one prescription was picked up by the patient, the testing strips for Jay. The other guy did not get the Prozac prescription, effectively making all the labor to fill it wasted, and created more labor to return it to stock. The soon-to-be-mom bought a prenatal supplement and left with several helpful ideas for conception strategies. In my judgement, all three of these were big wins for myself, my staff that were involved, and the student pharmacist that gained perspective on the delivery of very personal, even intimate counseling.

If we are lucky the patients will do one of those ubiquitous satisfaction surveys and we will get a second of recognition that way. Our metrics will suffer though, and that is a price that I am willing to pay. My patients know that they are not numbers to me. My whole team works hard to establish a solid rapport with each patient and from that grows the trust and mutual respect that lets our pharmacy thrive despite intense competition.

Metrics are a tool, a limited tool that will never be able to measure the kind of outcomes that health care providers work for every day. Labor hours should be added to the metrics algorithm that would allow us the time to treat all of our patients the way they deserve. Wouldn’t the loyalty and improved health and happiness of our patients be worth a couple hours of labor per week? After all we give ’em $25 just to transfer a prescription to us from a competitor. We should be playing the long game.